Author Topic: Phoenix Turner  (Read 32555 times)

Offline Bryan Milham

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2013, 09:18:06 PM »
The hollow form is fun, I do like what looks like a wing effect caused by the grain patterns.

but the natural edge bowls, these are what it's all about, showing off the wood to it's best effect.
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Offline Roderick Evans

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2013, 10:50:42 PM »
Hi Tom
Beautiful examples of your work,very impressive.
My personal favourite is the Olive NE bowl.
Look forward to seeing more examples in 2014
Regards,
Rod
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Offline edbanger

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2013, 11:26:12 PM »
Hi Tom and all the rest of you I'm also new to the forum my name is Ed. I'm also new to wood turning in fact so new I've brought a new lathe which I've had for a week and it's still not seen a piece of wood, (no power to the workshop until today)

Tom the yew look's stunning!!! And looking at your fb link so does the rest of your work, I will be a proud man if I can get my turning to look as good.

I have a question about yew, I purchase about a ton of yew for a few quid, from a fellow who got it for firewood, but thought it was too good to burn (how right he was) it's been cut since about March this year, how long do I need to leave it to season?

I'll post some more details about me in the near.

Ed

Offline Les Symonds

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2013, 06:20:57 AM »

I have a question about yew, I purchase about a ton of yew for a few quid, from a fellow who got it for firewood, but thought it was too good to burn (how right he was) it's been cut since about March this year, how long do I need to leave it to season?
Ed

Hi Ed, and welcome to the forum. As for your question; it's not a straightforward answer, I'm afraid. much depends on thickness and the old rule of thumb is to allow 1 year for each 1" of thickness. However, much can be done with green wood, if you're happy to experiment and to turn things down to a very thin wall-thickness, but perhaps as you're a complete beginner, that would be a bit too demanding for now.
If you've got logs, whether braches or trunks, get the ends smothered in something to seal them. Melted wax is ideal, but a good heavy coat of paint will do wonders if you haven't got access to wax. Wood loses moisture through the ends of the logs very rapidly, so this is where it's more inclined to crack.....sealing the ends will help to reduce the cracking.
It might also be worth investing in a little hand-held moisture meter. These are available on ebay and can be quite inexpensive....mine cost under £20 and is very useful. If you get one, try testing some of your furniture by jabbing its probes into the underside of table tops or chair rails, and you'll soon get a feel for what moisture content your own furniture is. Mine is at about 12%, so I tend to keep my wood in my workshop and get it down to about 15% to 18% moisture content if I'm making finished pieces for sale. However, I also turn quite wet wood, if I want pieces that are going to have a lot of character and natural defects I them.
Give it a go!
Les
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Offline Bryan Milham

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2013, 08:58:02 PM »
Ed,

trusting that Tom does not mind us hijacking his thread for a moment, take a look at the 11th post down here (http://www.awgb.co.uk/awgbforum/index.php/topic,1309.msg9513.html#msg9513) by Mark Sanger.

He shows how to section a log and how much extra timber to leave on wet wood to allow it to be re-turned once dry.

If you want more assistance, open a new thread and ask the question, we'll answer them for you.

And welcome to the forum.
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Offline flames

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #20 on: December 21, 2013, 10:21:41 PM »
Nice work there Flames !  Shallow profile/ squat hollow forms are not easy at all , but to show off crotch figuring they need to be shallow , I usually turn a platter from such wood ( because it is easier !!! )  so well done !  Looking at your info pics I was wondering what lathe are you using ?  and your preferred hollowing tool is ?    An Olive tree is a rare find !  a couple of years ago I delivered (by lorry ) a large Olive tree to Penzance , in a large tub the combined weight was about 2 tons !!    Terry......

Thanks Terry. The lathe I use the most is one I built myself, it's quite simple, just a bit of frame with some self aligning pillow block bearings Ø60mm spindle with a direct mount DIN6350 chuck, it's driven with an inverter speed controlled 3hp motor. The hollowing tool I use the most is probably the 'Big brother' but actually I use a variety of bastadised hollowing tools, depending on the task. I'm never quite happy with their performance though, what's your favorite hollowing tool, looks like you get some good results from the HF's of yours I've seen on Arbtalk.

...
Tom the yew look's stunning!!! And looking at your fb link so does the rest of your work, I will be a proud man if I can get my turning to look as good.
I have a question about yew, I purchase about a ton of yew for a few quid, from a fellow who got it for firewood, but thought it was too good to burn (how right he was) it's been cut since about March this year, how long do I need to leave it to season?
....
Ed

Thanks Ed & Welcome. I 2nd the above advise re your Yew. But I would further say with Yew specifically rough turn green/wet, it's so much easier to work, dry to a low moisture content (less than 10%) in a controlled way before finish turning and then seal it. Yew looks really stunning when you 1st turn it, but over time the colours dull. I've not fully concluded exactly how or why, but I think it's to do with it oxidising, so by really drying it and sealing it, it stands a better chance of aging well. You're welcome to give me a bell, and I can explain in more detail.

Thanks also for the other +ve comments, happy Crimbo!

Offline edbanger

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #21 on: December 22, 2013, 01:08:50 AM »
Thanks Tom and all for the advice, I think that I'll have a play with the yew and see what happens. Sorry if I've hijack you post Tom

Offline TWiG

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2013, 06:08:37 PM »
[

Thanks Terry. The lathe I use the most is one I built myself, it's quite simple, just a bit of frame with some self aligning pillow block bearings Ø60mm spindle with a direct mount DIN6350 chuck, it's driven with an inverter speed controlled 3hp motor. The hollowing tool I use the most is probably the 'Big brother' but actually I use a variety of bastadised hollowing tools, depending on the task. I'm never quite happy with their performance though, what's your favorite hollowing tool, looks like you get some good results from the HF's of yours I've seen on Arbtalk.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hi, again, I thought it could possibly be a home made lathe but just not sure !  For hollowing tools I use Sorby scrapers ( with 6mm finger nail tips ) but have a series of tool bars that I can fit  them to  , One is 4 foot long and 1" solid bar . I have a Big Brother but never use it to be honest , It seems fine on clean end grain but pretty useless on lumps of burr with voids, bark inclusions etc...  I have posted a few pics on Arbtalk (I was a Tree Surgeon for 20+years ) and just cannot get pics on this site !!!      Terry ....
« Last Edit: December 22, 2013, 06:13:07 PM by TWiG »

Offline woodndesign

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2013, 06:32:48 PM »
Tom, what more can I add, three delightful and stunning pieces, very difficult to say any one of them is the best, each has it's own character and merit, but above all it's having the whole tree .. opens a whole new realm of possibilities in form and figure, you can cut or orientate for the best grain, then a piece can still yield surprises during turning.

The narrow winner has to be the ... Olive .. and the Walnut just pips the Sweet Chestnut, then that's just me.

It's always nice to see WIP, it documents so much of interest and reference. You've had the Olive for sometime now, as I'm sure I'd seen a past post a year or so ago on you having to clear them from a garden, following their death from the years of relentless cold winters, the loss of some beautiful trees, but gain in timber.

Cheers   David
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Offline flames

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2014, 09:49:21 PM »
A recent completion - Oak burr, Ø350mm x 250mm, 12mm wall. I'm pleased with this piece, though it is very difficult to photograph well, like many turned items, it looks better in the flesh.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2014, 09:50:52 PM by flames »

Offline edbanger

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2014, 10:28:29 PM »
Hi Tom

Well these are stunning and get my vote.

Ed

Offline woodndesign

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2014, 12:09:03 AM »

Ah.. in the flesh, really with turning it's more getting to the bare bones, we strip away the surface and as here, come across the ultimate in perfection, one beautiful piece of figured burr, nature at it's best in a classic form.

Yep, very Pleasing to the eye, well done Tom.

Cheers  David
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Offline Bryan Milham

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2014, 08:56:54 AM »
There is a very thick growth layer on that Burr but it works in the final piece as the effect it produces enhances the form by it's extra depth under the natural edge.

A very fine form and great finish.
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Offline flames

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2015, 09:12:57 PM »
Hello folks, it's been quite some time since I've posted anything here, but I have enjoyed the recent gallery posts, so thought I should contribute one of my own.

Spalted Hornbeam NE, 250mm dia x 160mm tall, a little punky in places but pretty solid, finished with sanding sealer & Danish oil.


Offline georg

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Re: Phoenix Turner
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2015, 09:24:39 PM »

     Very striking piece Tom..... Finished to your usual high standard
      Tony Di
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