Author Topic: Advice on buying new lathe  (Read 417 times)

Offline Dean V

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Advice on buying new lathe
« on: October 27, 2019, 10:11:12 AM »
Hi everyone. I’m a builder who is looking at starting wood turning as a hobbie. I’ve been looking at lathes but can’t make a decision so any help would be greatly appreciated. I’ve narrowed my search to two lathes but anything else anyone can recommend for similar price would be great.
 The Axminster Craft AC355WL with discounted chuck accessories for£624.96
 The Power Record DML320 for £599

Offline Lazurus

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2019, 12:13:40 PM »
For that sort of money I would look at a second hand package as there are considerable ancillary costs for tooloing, chucks and drives, sharpening, finishes etc the list is endless.
Living and working on the Norfolk Broads

Offline Dean V

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2019, 12:49:16 PM »
Not considered this option will look into thanks

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2019, 10:37:36 PM »
Hi Dean,

First thing I would recommend is you get along to your local AWGB club awgb.co.uk/clubs

Both lathes you have suggested are good kit, but as said there is a lot more than a lathe needed for wood turning., including chucks, chisels, something to keep those chisels sharp, a saw to get the timber into shape to put on the lathe for many of us that is a bandsaw.

The more you know the better your choices will be when you start spending.   

Offline Dean V

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2019, 12:46:11 AM »
Thanks for the advise Twisted. I already have a nice workshop set up ,it was geared up for knife making and have a few machines which will help with the wood. I m under no illusion that getting a lathe is the be all and end all , just looking at the price of chisels is enough to put someone off,but having said that my son and I are going to throw some money at what looks like a very interesting and rewarding hobbie. I was hoping for a bit of help in choosing a lathe.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2019, 01:03:39 AM »
The problem with choosing a lathe, is it depends on what you are going to make, I started with a second hand Myford Mystro, and now use an Axminster 1628 which allows me to make bigger diameter things, and with the bed extension has the same bed length as the Myford so I can still make fairly long things....

While it is mostly true that you can make small things on a big lathe it is a waste of space if you never use the capacity...

The 2 you have proposed are medium duty medium size lathes and both very capable IF they fit your requirements. The problem with giving advice is we don't know what your requirements are!

My personal opinion is buy a second hand lathe that comes with a chuck and a set of chisels, learn on that and replace bits / add bits as you progress.

My other personal opinion is buy the Record Power DML320, along with the Record Power Chuck, then add a starter set of Robert Sorby Chisels PLUS a set of cheap crappy chisels to learn sharpening on, I guess if you have been knife making you have a sharpening system and some knowledge. Then get a lot of bits of timber and make shavings until you are ready to go get some training.

My sensible advice however remains, go find your local club talk to people, get some training then start buying kit that does what you know you want to do.

 

 
« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 01:20:08 AM by Twisted Trees »

Offline bodrighywood

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2019, 07:58:05 AM »
I wouldn't buy a starter set as the tools in them aren;'t really the best for starting.You need a spindle gouge, skew, roughing gouge, bowl gouge and parting tool. you can make most things with that lot. One set a student brought to me recently had two spindle gouges, one  bowl gouge (all small sizes), a scraper and a skew. As far as buying 2nd hand goes, make sur that either you or someone you take with you knows what to look for in a lathe and as said stop and think what you are looking to make then multiply as I guarantee you will  want to do more as you get into it.

Pete
Turners don't make mistakes, they have design opportunities

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2019, 08:36:48 AM »
I wouldn't buy a starter set as the tools in them aren;'t really the best for starting.You need a spindle gouge, skew, roughing gouge, bowl gouge and parting tool.

That is why I was specific about the Robert Sorby set, quality tools which includes 3/4" Spindle roughing gouge, 3/8" Spindle gouge, 3/8” Bowl gouge,  3/4" Standard skew chisel, Parting tool, 1/2" Round nose scraper. Only the last one is suspect set packing!

Also I like the handles on Sorby, and though I make my own handles I shamelessly copy their style.

There is a Silverline chisel set for about £24 on Ebay, rubbish tools for cutting wood, but great grinder fodder to practice and learn sharpening on, and so much less scary than  screwing up a £140 set of good tools.

Very early days I did the Max Cary apprenticeship,  one of the key side benefits was they had a lot of different lathes and a lot of tools both in the trust, and also the members own sets, which probably saved me a lot of money because I bought a lot less of what I don't use than I would have done without that group experience.

« Last Edit: October 28, 2019, 09:00:32 AM by Twisted Trees »

Offline Dean V

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2019, 08:52:57 AM »
Thanks bodrighywood. Will be getting some training. There is a great shop near Doncaster that offers training
.
 


Offline BrianH

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2019, 03:15:08 PM »
worth remembering that sets of tools are chosen to suit the maker rather than the end user. its no coincidence that all the chosen tools fit nicely into the same box in spite of the roughing and bowl gouges needing far more length for efficient use.
My advice would be to buy a spindle gouge and parting tool with handles and then make your own handles for the rest as needs arise. it works out that you can buy 3 unhandled tools for the price of 2 with handles and you get the turning practise thrown in for free.
I also suggest a second hand lathe to start with. it is common knowledge in the trade that most newby turners either give up or change lathes after about 18 months, no matter what they buy to strart with.
all the best, though, whatever you decide
Brian

Offline Lazurus

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Re: Advice on buying new lathe
« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2019, 03:38:28 PM »
Living and working on the Norfolk Broads