Author Topic: Thread chasing  (Read 262 times)

Offline crazylegs

  • bronze
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
Thread chasing
« on: September 12, 2019, 08:22:29 PM »
A bit of help and knowledge needed. I am going to try thread chasing but am struggling to know how to size the two parts. Do i just make them a tight fit or do you need some play. If I make the male and female parts the same size will the chaser cut enough to allow the thread to work or do I need it a little smaller?
never try to be better than others just better than you were yesterday.

Offline Percy

  • copper
  • **
  • Posts: 51
    • Percy Bishton
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2019, 08:57:21 PM »
Size the piece with the male thread by cutting a small spigot that just fits inside the piece with the female thread. Then cut a slightly larger diameter spigot (ideally about the height of the thread you want to cut more than the first spigot) just behind this one and chase the male thread onto this. A little adjustment might be required, but you should get a very good fit. There is an excellent old video somewhere on youtube of Allan Batty teaching hand thread chasing which is well worth a watch. He explains it much better than I think I just did!

Offline The Bowler Hatted Turner

  • platinum
  • *****
  • Posts: 2068
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2019, 10:34:31 PM »
Crazylegs Percy's discription is pretty good, I always chase the female thread first and as he said cut a (very small) spigot to fit snuggly inside the female thread, then on the male thread increase the diameter further up the spigot by 2depths of the thread plus a bit. Cut the thread and it will be a little tight, reduce the diameter a smidgeon leaving the thread visible and chase again, to strengthen the threads I take the tops off a little and also you can coat them with super glue or friction polish or similar. Once done rub a bit of candle wax on the threads. You may also explore tapered threads but that is a bit different. I would also recommend using an arm rest for the female chasing as it saves moving the tool rest all the time.
One last bit of advice, get hold of some plastic pipe and practice on that.

Offline Buzzbee

  • iron
  • *
  • Posts: 28
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2019, 12:09:08 PM »
The problem with the double spigot method is that it interferes dramatically with any attempt to grain match.

Offline crazylegs

  • bronze
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2019, 12:40:35 PM »
Thanks for the replies. I think I have my head round it.
never try to be better than others just better than you were yesterday.

Offline Derek

  • platinum
  • *****
  • Posts: 1110
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2019, 01:57:54 PM »
I sat and watched this VIDEO last night after reading this thread

Offline burywoodturners

  • gold
  • ****
  • Posts: 277
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2019, 04:59:45 PM »
So did I, some time ago admittedly, great demo, unlike some on YouTube, and learned enough to make a thread in box.
Probably the bet vieo tutrial on the topic.
Ron

Offline happy amateur

  • bronze
  • ***
  • Posts: 72
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2019, 05:11:47 PM »
There is a very good DVD on the market by John Berkeley - Screwples: a definitive guide to hand thread chasing, but do not buy it from KTMP.


Fred Taylor
orchard-woodturners.org.uk

Offline otterbank

  • copper
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2019, 09:10:41 PM »
The Allan Batty video is excellent and also read Bill Jones’ writings on thread chasing. I don’t think you can go far wrong with the guidance of these guys. I only wish I could have had a cup of coffee and a yarn with the pair of them.

Offline The Bowler Hatted Turner

  • platinum
  • *****
  • Posts: 2068
Re: Thread chasing
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2019, 07:56:38 AM »
The problem with the double spigot method is that it interferes dramatically with any attempt to grain match.
Grain matching can be achieved by taking a fine cut off of one of the mating faces.