Author Topic: Dust extraction  (Read 1816 times)

Offline Vestas

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Dust extraction
« on: June 18, 2019, 05:00:39 PM »
I have a lathe in my garage and wear a mark with filter but would like to reduce the dust in the room.
I have looked at a couple of options - one being a standalone dust filter that hangs from the ceiling £170 in yandles and looked at the ones that stand near the lathe and suck the dust - anyone recommend anything £200-250 ish
Thanks
Mike 

Offline The Bowler Hatted Turner

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2019, 09:09:58 PM »
Vestas you have mentioned here 2 different systems. The one in the ceiling is for the dust floating in the air the other is for extracting the dust from the work area. I would say that if you use a mask then buy the one that extracts from the work area. Obviously both would be better.

Offline Vestas

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2019, 07:52:15 PM »
I bought Pete’s (twisted trees) dust extraction DX1000 with all the extras you could hope for, for £90 which was a bargain - I’m getting a record ceiling unit this week to complete the setup
Many thanks for the advice

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2019, 10:19:53 AM »
Good to see you are getting onto dust management so early in the setup. remember what I said, running the ceiling mounted air filter for an hour after after you finished will do wonders for the next morning before you put the PPE kit on, and vacuum the floor rather than sweep it will also help to keep the dust out of the air.

Offline makkem

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2019, 11:36:34 AM »
Is there a vacuum cleaner style dust and shavings collector that anyone can recommend without me going bankrupt?
Thanks in advance of any advice.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2019, 02:00:21 PM »
Is there a vacuum cleaner style dust and shavings collector that anyone can recommend without me going bankrupt?
Thanks in advance of any advice.

It is all about the scale, you could use a standard vacuum but the bags and filters will be full very quickly! I used to be very happy with the Record Power DX1000, good capacity and good suction though a tad noisy. I now use a much bigger system that dumps directly into a full size wheelie bin.

Offline makkem

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2019, 05:25:35 PM »
Thanks I'll have a look at it.  Using the household Dyson at the  minute which is getting me some 'looks'. ::)

Online Martin Lawrence

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2019, 06:59:13 PM »
  Any suction cleaner will removes dust from the air, but the air comes back out of the dust bag along with the small particles of dust that cause the most amount of damage.

To be efficient, the dust back should be so fine as not to release dust particles larger than 0.5 of a micron, this obviusly makes it more expensive than a house cleaner but then again what value do you put on your lungs ?

Cheers Martin.
Martin Lawrence

Offline bodrighywood

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2019, 07:10:49 PM »
The best way (usually impractical for a small workshop) would be to have the collection section outside the workshop.

Pete
Turners don't make mistakes, they have design opportunities

Offline John Plater

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2019, 12:12:23 PM »
About 15 years ago, when it was percieved that I had a responsibility to people who worked with me, I was able to purchase a secondary filter for a "Henry" vacuum cleaner which was supposed only to allow the finest of micro dust to escape. Yes, vacuuming is better for the workspace environment than sweeping but it is by no means a perfect answer. Wet mopping works well on dust only but most waste has shavings and swarf in it as well. We need to be aware of the problem and do the best we can to circumvent it.
ATB John
If I had a better lathe, I would be able to show my ineptitude more effectively.

Offline John Plater

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2019, 12:13:56 PM »
Oops, just spotted a smelling pistake, many apologies, should have been perceived  ;D
ATB John
If I had a better lathe, I would be able to show my ineptitude more effectively.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Dust extraction
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2019, 02:52:46 PM »
If you are serious about it then an air filter as a secondary system is a must.  e.g. the Record AC400 Two Stage Air Filter which filters down to 1 micron, the smaller it is the worse it is, you seldom get anyone having breathing issues with shavings! One problem with high pressure systems is it is hard for the filter to be effective and not squirt fine dust back into the atmosphere, though many domestic systems now have a 5 micron filter option this is often in the form of a bag for the dust collection so gets expensive over time.

Bottom line is you need to go low end commercial which looks expensive, but over a 2 year period pays for itself in running costs. My extraction is to a 30 micron bag, but that is outside the workshop in an extension shed with a passive pressure feed back through a 5 micron filter to prevent all my heating getting pumped outside.  backed up with a 1 micron air filter that mostly cleans the air in the hour after I leave the workshop so I don't need PPE before I go in next morning.

Is it perfect? of course not, it will never be perfect but its the best I can do.