Author Topic: Exotics  (Read 761 times)

Offline GBF

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #30 on: August 28, 2019, 10:05:12 PM »
Twisted Trees has put it exactly as I meant it Thank you

Regards George
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Online bodrighywood

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2019, 10:16:40 PM »
If you look at the endangered species list ,the Cites list, African Blackwood is not listed.

No but it is regulated in its native country along with other woods.

Pete
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Offline Paul Hannaby

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2019, 11:52:08 PM »
Doesn't African Blackwood come under the rosewood family, which is controlled under CITES appendix 2.

George, your definition of "exotics" could include pine because it is imported from a number of countries - Canada, Scandinavian countries etc. Also Oak, which is imported from various countries, Ash etc etc.

A separate question - most if not all the UK suppliers of turning wood claim to source their timber from "managed resources". Do we take that at face value? Should we expect more of them in terms of ethics by only sourcing wood which is from sustainable sources? This would exclude those part worked blanks done to circumvent local restrictions and timber from trees which could never be described as sustainable because they take so long to grow!

Should we follow the lead of food producer and advertise "wood miles" for the things we make and sell?

Offline GBF

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #33 on: August 29, 2019, 12:00:55 AM »
You are keep asking questions Paul lets turn it around and tell us what you think I think you all know my views

Regards George
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Offline michaelb

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2019, 08:53:41 AM »
Having spent 40 years in the food  industry it is impossible to give even approximate "food miles" the definition is below

A mile over which a food item is transported during the journey from producer to consumer, as a unit of measurement of the fuel used to transport it.

The key word in the definition is producer yes you can do it on fresh singe item fruit and veg but  not on any processed product

So the who is the producer the Logger, The Mill, or the producer of the blank or the person who turns the blank a and sells it at the local craft show.

Paul I am sorry but to even think of wood miles is crazy

Offline willstewart

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #35 on: August 29, 2019, 11:25:15 AM »
And food miles are notoriously dominated by the personal trips to the supermarket (because the load is small - whereas suppliers move in bulk).  And surely the concern with wood is not transport energy anyway - sustainable timber from far away would be better than unsustainable locally.  For energy concerns we might worry more about what we do with the shavings/offcuts (which weigh more than the final objects in my case anyway).  Mine go as compost or fire fuel, though burning shavings is tricky, unless anyone knows of a good way?

Offline John Plater

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #36 on: August 29, 2019, 07:06:59 PM »
Doesn't African Blackwood come under the rosewood family, which is controlled under CITES appendix 2.

George, your definition of "exotics" could include pine because it is imported from a number of countries - Canada, Scandinavian countries etc. Also Oak, which is imported from various countries, Ash etc etc.

A separate question - most if not all the UK suppliers of turning wood claim to source their timber from "managed resources". Do we take that at face value? Should we expect more of them in terms of ethics by only sourcing wood which is from sustainable sources? This would exclude those part worked blanks done to circumvent local restrictions and timber from trees which could never be described as sustainable because they take so long to grow!

I have purchased palo santo (bulnesia sarmientoi) in the past and was given to understand that the part worked blanks was the only way in which the Argentinian authorities would allow the timber (not on CITES appendix 1) to be exported. In other words the people in the country of origin are in control, I think. More recently, much of this material has been ripped out to grow oil palm trees and the palo santo has been sold to China as building material. This sounds like double standards. How do we know, who should we believe ? This I learned from a person recently returned from living and working in Argentina, the only person I have met who recognised the stuff on my stand at a show.
ATB John
Should we follow the lead of food producer and advertise "wood miles" for the things we make and sell?
If I had a better lathe, I would be able to show my ineptitude more effectively.

Offline Les Symonds

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #37 on: August 29, 2019, 07:26:21 PM »
......advertise "wood miles" for the things we make and sell?
That would work for me.....the bulk of my timber stock is sourced within a mile of my workshop, which is within 200metres of my shop. At best, I have sold bowls with a "wood mile" of 0.1" each.
Les
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Offline Paul Hannaby

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Re: Exotics
« Reply #38 on: August 30, 2019, 02:03:12 AM »
Hi George,
The reason I keep asking questions is to find out exactly what you are calling "exotics". I don't think you have fully explained that yet.

I think I have put some of my views forward in my previous comments but I guess I would say we should try to use all wood responsibly and ethically. I have all sorts of native and imported timber from various parts of the world, much of which was bought as unused stock from other turners / woodworkers rather than from the retailers. Much of these were bought and stored many years ago and me using or not using them won't make any difference to the current world order. If I was buying new wood, I would consider where it came from and how that might impact the environment in the long term.