Author Topic: Air filteration  (Read 1487 times)

Offline Redtails5

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Air filteration
« on: January 13, 2019, 04:09:53 PM »
Hi
Happy new year to you all
Air filteration who has what , comments on your own systems if you wanted to replace it what would you consider/buy for your workshop.
At the moment i do not have any but use the lathe on average for say two hours per week on average with a trend
Air shield giving protection i want to up the workshop time ispend in there by 2-3 per day and there for want to introduce cleaner air into the workshop
Its about 6/ 8 sq metres .

Offline John Plater

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2019, 08:47:05 PM »
I do my sanding, the source of most dust, in a 10' x 8' shed. There is a record moving air extraction device attached to the lathe to remove as much as possible at source. I also use a CamVac twin motor vacuum system where it seems more appropriate to the job in hand Then I have one of the small cylindrical Microclene air filters which collects an amazing amount of fine dust.
ATB John
If I had a better lathe, I would be able to show my ineptitude more effectively.

Offline Paul Hannaby

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2019, 12:00:16 AM »
Dust removal generally breaks down into three areas -
  • Extraction (preferably at source) removes as much as possible as soon as possible.
  • Ambient air filtration cleans the air in the workshop
  • PPE deals with what's left.

It's likely an effective solution will need to address all three of these areas.

Offline Tim Cornwall

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2019, 06:42:52 PM »
 I have a Record  Power DX 1000 vac and  clamp the 100mm hose under the piece i am sanding this catches most, i have also got the Record Power AC400 have this running all the time i'm in the shop and leave on for 1 hr  after i leave shop  ( shop  16X 10 ft),  i have noticed a big reduction in airborne dust since i set this up .
we have a Jet AFS 500 at work  which does the same job as my record power, but costs about twice as much, and 5 year warranty on RP stuff.
we had Mike Hanbury demo at our club a couple of months ago  he wet sands with a homemade sanding paste  80%   liquid paraffin  and 20% beeswax      ( heat  to melt wax in paraffin and store in airtight container), if  abrasive clogs a quick brush with a stiff brush does the trick and the 'slurry' it produces just falls to the ground, not found sanding takes any longer really, just a quick brush  of abrasive every now and then, been sanding with this for a couple of months and dust is minimal,  and the  little  longer may take is offset by air quality, sanding paste is cheap and easy to make ,  as for  PPE i wear a axminster APF10 Evalution powered resporator

good luck ,and hope this helps  Tim

Offline BrianH

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2019, 10:10:41 AM »
I am also a firm believer in not making the dust in the first place. My chosen method is to use Danish oil on the abrasive, similar to Tim's wax-based method, you have the option of continuing with oil for a 'sheen' finish or wax over for if you want shinier. Wait until the oil has dried before waxing.
I also run a Record extractor but believe the oil method is more advantageous than making dust and then trying to extract it.
 Brian

Offline Redtails5

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2019, 11:16:42 AM »
Hi
Some very interesting comments on this topic the whole idea was to sort out the chaff from the wheat has far has air bourne filteration is concerned to draw people to give there
Views. As far has using some form of liquid when sanding
I have used sunflower oil to both collect dust and to help with a surface finish.

Offline Derek

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2019, 11:34:26 AM »
At the moment I have an extractor at the source to take away a lot of the dust as well as wearing a powered mask. Unfortunately, I don't have room for any other dust extractor.
When I finish sanding I will remove my PPE and leave the shed immediately to allow airborne dust to settle and then vac up to clean later. I have to have a good clean at least twice before I move onto applying colour/finishes usually the next day giving all of the dust time to settle. Many think that as soon as you finish sanding it is no longer there but as many on here know it hangs about. Sorry to state the obvious to many here.
I don't wet sand as most of my work needs clean wood to apply my colours and finishes

Offline BrianH

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2019, 09:30:36 AM »
Hi Derick
I obviously have no idea what type of colours you are using but I find that if you dry sand down to 240 then splash the stain about before wet sanding the finer grades gives beautiful colours with a silky feel..... it works for me.
Brian

Offline hughie

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2019, 10:35:51 AM »
What I have is maybe only good for a warm climate. I have whirly bird vent on the roof that I have build a fan into it to . I have attached flexible 100mm ducting down to the lathe with another fan at mid point in the ducting. Then using magnets I move the ducting around to get the best angle and sometimes its attached to the tool rest.

Secondly I in the process of fitting a slow revving but relatively high volume fan in the wall adjacent to the lathe. The fan is around 650mm dia. The slow rpm is good as it relatively silent and will run constantly when I am in the workshop, I also leave the door open at the other end of the workshop to give cross flow ventilation.

Offline Lazurus

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2019, 02:00:49 PM »
What I have is maybe only good for a warm climate. I have whirly bird vent on the roof that I have build a fan into it to . I have attached flexible 100mm ducting down to the lathe with another fan at mid point in the ducting. Then using magnets I move the ducting around to get the best angle and sometimes its attached to the tool rest.

Secondly I in the process of fitting a slow revving but relatively high volume fan in the wall adjacent to the lathe. The fan is around 650mm dia. The slow rpm is good as it relatively silent and will run constantly when I am in the workshop, I also leave the door open at the other end of the workshop to give cross flow ventilation.

Ok if you are in a warm climate but any heat in the workshop will be sucked out. BRRRRRR! I use Microclene filtration coupled with a dust / chip extractor with the main unit and collection drum outside the workshop, and piped in through the wall.
Living and working on the Norfolk Broads

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Air filteration
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2019, 05:13:35 PM »
My chip and dust handling is completely inadequate, just doesn't get the job done. So my goal by the end of this year is to revise and design a working system, clean out the entire workshop and rebuild starting with the dust handling. First I am experimenting with a home made 100mm input and output cyclone it will be tested with my RP DX1000 but end goal is to run that with a hi volume low pressure extractor fan possibly with an option for returning into the workshop via a filter or venting directly outside depending on the season.

I do have the Jet 1000 hanging above the lathe but that is only going to clear airborne fine particles and I am going to experiment with wet sanding to reduce or eliminate that issue. Machine placement is also going to be high on the agenda in reducing bends and run length I am hoping to get away with smaller quieter suction engines.