Author Topic: Cole jaws v longworth chuck  (Read 20392 times)

Paul Disdle

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Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« on: April 02, 2013, 08:25:59 PM »
Could someone enlighten me of the pros and cons of either cole jaws or a longworth chuck. Has anybody made one or the other or has plans?

Thanks

Paul

Offline dr4g0nfly

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2013, 09:46:17 PM »
I have both, made the Longworth and bought the Coles.

I stole the information off of the internet, so what I post here is not mine, and is available from other sources and in other guises;
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Paul Disdle

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2013, 10:07:49 PM »
Which do you prefer?

Thanks

Paul

Offline dr4g0nfly

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2013, 10:23:30 PM »
There isn't a preference, to me they work differently.

The Coles Jaws I can tighten onto a form ( or expand into the the shape permits it) and therefore I feel it has better holding power, they are also smaller, so used on smaller items.

The Longworth, I made to the maximum diameter of my lathe's throw. It has fewer button's, therefore I run it much slower and only for fruit platters that are quite flat in section. As it grips by the action of the rotation I don't tend to trust it quite as much. Certainly not without the tailstock brought up anyway.

If you Google you will find manufactured ones now available and even small homemade ones that would equate to the Coles.

With either tail support is highly recommended because (hard to explain) when moving the gouge across the timber, you cause a 'lifting' action which if you are not careful will dismount the wood.

The homemade chuck to over-come this is the donut chuck (Google with American spelling)
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Paul Disdle

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2013, 10:28:28 PM »
Thanks, I am looking for the best solution for bottom cleaning. I only have a jet mini lathe so homemade longworth should hopefully do the job. The donut chuck looks interesting.

Paul

Offline dr4g0nfly

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2013, 10:32:45 PM »
Don't forget to post your completed chuck.
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Offline bodrighywood

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2013, 10:47:46 PM »
I made a wooden faceplate and glued thick foam to it. I use that for cleaning the bottom of bowls with the tail stock holding the work in place. I use mine on a jet mini as well as on the larger lathe and it's fine. You need to clean the last little nipple off with a chisel and sand that but it's fine apart from that. When you turn your tenon initially make a little indent in the centre so you can centre the bowl or whatever up to clean the bottom.

Pete
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Andy Coates

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2013, 06:35:38 PM »
I am looking for the best solution for bottom cleaning.
Paul

Andrex?

Paul Disdle

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2013, 08:56:03 PM »
 :D

Offline malcy

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2013, 08:58:02 PM »
I have all three, Cole jaws, and homemade Longworth and donut chucks. The Cole jaws are from Sorby and fit both my Axminster and Record 4 jaw chucks. The Longworth I tend to use off lathe for ring centering in my segmented lay ups. For removing chuck mounts on bowl or vase bottoms I tend to always use the donut chuck as I think this is alot more secure. I have a few top donut rings I have made for various projects, and if I need a different size I simply turn one from 18mm MDF and use that with the standard base. If pushed I would say use a donut chuck always, and it doesn't cost much to make. Hope this helps. Malcolm.

Offline malcy

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2013, 09:06:23 PM »
One thing I didn't mention is that when using the donut chuck the tailstock centre is used to position and hold the turning centrally, and the bolts and studs are then tightened with some cushioning between the donut ring and the turning. Once secure the tailstock is removed, leaving plenty of space around the base for the toolrest and tool manipulation. If you want I can post a couple of pictures of my donut chuck in place with a bowl being finished on the base. This will be in a couple of days though. Malcolm.

Paul Disdle

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2013, 09:08:05 PM »
Thanks Malcolm, pictures would be handy when you have time.

Paul

Offline malcy

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2013, 09:20:11 PM »
Hi Paul. As I fonished typing the last posting, I realised I already had some donut chuck pictures on my computer, so here they are. If you need any advice or other pictures of the chuck or parts, then please ask and I'll post some more pics in a day or so. Hope these help. Malcolm.

Offline Eric Harvey

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2013, 09:51:32 AM »
I go for the 2 layers of cloth over the chuck if its a small bowl,or I have 3 different sized pieces of 1/2" ply turned round with a single layer of cloth over both methods with tailstock brought up with light pressure,regards,

Eric.
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Paul Disdle

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Re: Cole jaws v longworth chuck
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2013, 08:15:58 AM »
I made this to start with

10" mdf circle with a faceplate ring on the back and router type mat on the front.