Recent Posts

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21
Gallery / Chestnut Burr
« Last post by Derek on October 18, 2019, 05:30:36 PM »
Managed to get into the workshop and finish this burr today.
Made from one of the chestnut burrs that I have, still two more to go. Finished with oil and measures 10 1/2" X 4".

C and C Welcome

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General Discussion / Re: Walnut Oil
« Last post by GBF on October 18, 2019, 04:32:38 PM »
The problem with using any nut oil is if somebody has a nu allergy it could kill them'
If you want to use supermarket oil i would suggest you use Rapeseed oil

Regards George
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General Discussion / Re: Walnut Oil
« Last post by Les Symonds on October 18, 2019, 04:23:04 PM »
I'm not familiar with Mahoney's, so don't know how to compare brands, but there's a wealth of businesses selling walnut oil in the UK, including your local Waitrose!
Les
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For Sale / Axminster M900 lathe and ancilliaries
« Last post by edrose on October 18, 2019, 03:25:04 PM »
Axminster M 900 Woodturning lathe complete with 2 off 4 prong centres, 2 live centres, ½ inch Steb centre, screw chuck, drill chuck, Axminster K10 Clubman chuck with 25/38/50 O’Donnell jaws, small and large gripper jaws, 8  inch button jaws. Peter Child Master chuck.
The lathe is 16 years old and runs a little noisy but works fine. .I've found it's suitable for a wide range of smaller items e. g. bowls under 12 inches diameter (although head does rotate), boxes, vases, small hollow forms, and the like.  It would be ideal for someone starting out who wants to see what they can do before purchasing a much heavier and more expensive lathe. Or someone who just wants a back up lathe for suitable work.  It has manual variable speed control.
Plus range of woodturning chisels and other woodturning related items
Am happy to negotiate price depending on what is required.
Buyer to collect from just south of Cambridge
25
General Discussion / Walnut Oil
« Last post by icewoodturning on October 18, 2019, 12:51:50 PM »
I've been wanting to try walnut oil as a food safe finish. Does anyone know if there is an equivalent to Mahoney's walnut oil available in the UK?
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General Discussion / Re: African Blackwood
« Last post by Twisted Trees on October 18, 2019, 01:17:14 AM »
Sorry Jeff, we have diverted your topic... But since we are on that tangent... I agree on not liking varnishes, I once got into using CA glue as a finish on pens, they were very shiny and no matter how long the essay you would not put a permanent finger print on it, and they actually sold well too, but I didn't like it and stopped making pens completely because they just were not tactile. 

One of my favorite pieces of wood is the banister in Temple Meads, Bristol, railway station. It was probably oiled once with boiled linseed or something similar, and I bet it was perfectly straight 150 years ago. Now it is oiled by millions of greasy hands, softer areas have worn into gentle indented curves, but I am a silly sod who strokes logs! 

Anyway back to the chemical burns on African Blackwood Jeff if you have some off-cuts to play with try washing in acetone then give both the first 2 suggestions a go, and also maybe the Teak reviving oil with wax on top it's what pleases you that matters. and far better to try things out on a piece of flat wood that you have not spent hours on.
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General Discussion / Re: African Blackwood
« Last post by bodrighywood on October 17, 2019, 07:29:47 PM »
Must admit John I am a bit stuck in a rut with finishes. What works for me for years has been pure carnauba wax buffed on. I do use microcrystalline occasionally. What I don't personally like is lacquers and varnishes and that, as someone called it 'plastic' look. Be interesting excercise to put several peces done with different finishes together and see what the difference is exactly. Tactility is important IMHO with wood, differenet woods feel different, look different and eveb smell dfferent and cam all contribute to the attraction (or otherwise) of a piece.

Pete
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General Discussion / Re: African Blackwood
« Last post by John Plater on October 17, 2019, 06:51:20 PM »
Joe public i.e. the non turning fraternity aren't that keen on oiled wood. Tried it early on and it tended to get ignored ukless it was a utility piece. Mind they don't like that really heavy lacquered look either. Might be different for coloured work but I find that well polished work sells best at shows.
Pete


IMHO Joe public don't know what a finish is !! ;) Most people are taken by the tactility of a surface. I have never met any resistance to a hard wax oil finish. People with any appreciation of wood, know of hard wax oil or are interested in the story of it. If I have the time, cellulose sealer, wax and then cutting back with 0000 steel wool takes a lot of beating. The problem is that very many of the piecesI do are from less than sound material and wax is a non starter. So the hard wax oil is a more than suitable compromise. I have used it for 10 of my 12 years of selling work.
ATB John
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General Discussion / Re: African Blackwood
« Last post by bodrighywood on October 17, 2019, 04:03:44 PM »
Joe public i.e. the non turning fraternity aren't that keen on oiled wood. Tried it early on and it tended to get ignored ukless it was a utility piece. Mind they don't like that really heavy lacquered look either. Might be different for coloured work but I find that well polished work sells best at shows.

Pete
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General Discussion / Re: African Blackwood
« Last post by Wood spinner on October 17, 2019, 03:11:47 PM »
In my view it is a finish which leaves a piece of wood looking like a piece of wood.
ATB John

Interesting point there John, so many pieces I see in competitions etc. are so fine and glossy they take on a plastic appearance, and even more so become plastic to the touch as well. I like wood to look and importantly feel like wood, sometimes that means  putting up with the odd imperfection because it was grown not molded.

Probably due to the craze of Yourshire grit and YG micro fine
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