Author Topic: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe  (Read 337 times)

Offline Mike313

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Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« on: May 17, 2019, 08:33:44 AM »
Hi Folks,
I'm thinking about buying the Axminster Trade AT406WL lathe (used to be called the AT1628VS) and mounting it on a home-made bench with closeable storage underneath. Can I bolt the lathe directly to the bench or do I need to bolt it to bench feet and then bolt the feet to the bench?
Ta in advance,
Mike.

Offline bodrighywood

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 08:52:24 AM »
Main thing is getting the height right, need ti have the centre roughly at your elbow height. How you bolt it is basically a matter of making sure it is a strong enough base and well fixed. You will also need to have it positioned so you can take advantage of its swivelling head and, if needs be the, sliding headstock as these can make a huge difference to the size of bowl etc you turn.

Pete
Turners don't make mistakes, they have design opportunities

Offline fuzzyturns

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 09:00:35 AM »
Pete is spot on with his reply. Also make sure that your bench is of sufficient weight (or you add ballast once it's all where you want it. I have the Twister FU-200, which is essentially the same lathe and despite it weighing around 200kg (with cast iron legs and some other bits) it does go dancing around the shop when I turn heavy and out-of-balance pieces. You would want to have at least 150kg underneath that lathe.

Offline Derek

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 10:39:21 AM »
Looking at the lathe in question I can not see any reason for not being able to bolt it straight to the bench it just means that if you want any clearance under the lathe it will be reduced. Without seeing the lathe in the flesh to see if any part of it protrudes below the mounting points to prevent this. After all if you was to buy the legs the lathe is bolted straight to them.
I appreciate what the two comments above are saying and are very valid when setting up a lathe.

Offline Mike313

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2019, 12:17:43 PM »
Thanks for the replies, folks. The reason I asked about whether bench feet were necessary was to ensure I get the centre height at 1165mm (elbow height) above the floor as (at least as a starting point) I think this is the height that will suit - definitely not lower, perhaps higher (it will be easier for me to add height than to take it away). I have dimensions for the lathe - underside to centre of the drive is 365mm - so I have 800mm under the lathe to achieve a height of 1165mm to the centre of the drive. So if it can be directly mounted to a bench, the bench will be 800mm high, or less than that if bench feet are essential. I'm going to put a compartment in the bottom of the bench to take ballast, probably from scrap metal is I can find the right bits. Then some storage with selves above that and two doors to the front. I'm also putting a recess at the bottom (like you see on kitchen units) to allow feet to stand close to the lathe. The side panels will flare out at the bottom to ensure the bench is as stable as possible.

Offline Twisted Trees

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #5 on: May 17, 2019, 03:29:25 PM »
Just a thought, because there are smaller air gaps, sand per cubic inch is heavier then scrap metal for ballast weight and easier to work with as well especially if you keep it in plastic bags.

Offline Derek

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2019, 06:59:13 PM »
Just a thought, because there are smaller air gaps, sand per cubic inch is heavier then scrap metal for ballast weight and easier to work with as well especially if you keep it in plastic bags.

Also, scrape metal can be turned into cash to buy more tools ;)

Offline John D Smith

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2019, 07:18:33 PM »

 Hi Mike, I have a similar Axminster Lathe which I bolted to a bench I did put some thin 4mm rubber pads underneath the

feet to cushion  vibration my lathe the mounting holes were from the underside so I had to make a Template out of cardboard

to get the holes in the correct position on the bench (good use of some of the box it came in).

                                                                   Regards John
John Smith

Offline Derwent Woodturning club

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2019, 02:05:36 PM »
As well as getting the height right for yourself, make sure you mount the lathe as close to the front of the bench as possible. All to often I see students who have mounted the lathe in the middle of the bench to evenly distribute the weight but this prevents them getting close to the work, thereby reducing tool control. It sounds a trivial thing but you will be surprised how often you get 'up close and personal' with your lathe.
Regards,
Paul Bellamy
Secretary for the Derwent Woodturning Club
Swadlincote, Derbyshire.
Please contact me for more information.

Offline Mike313

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Re: Question about bench-mounting a Lathe
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2019, 03:43:10 PM »
Thanks everyone for the advice.
Bags of sand as ballast would certainly be more manageable.
I was planning to put a sheet of rubber pond liner under the base of the bench (which will have a flat bottom) to cushion vibration so good to hear that someone else did similar  ;)
The bench I have sketched up will have the lathe right at the front, with a recess at floor level along the front for feet and the sides of the bench will project to the front so as to be stable.